The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale
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Best-selling author Dan Buettner debuts his first cookbook, filled with 100 longevity recipes inspired by the Blue Zones locations around the world, where people live the longest.

Building on decades of research, longevity expert Dan Buettner has gathered 100 recipes inspired by the Blue Zones, home to the healthiest and happiest communities in the world. Each dish--for example, Sardinian Herbed Lentil Minestrone; Costa Rican Hearts of Palm Ceviche; Cornmeal Waffles from Loma Linda, California; and Okinawan Sweet Potatoes--uses ingredients and cooking methods proven to increase longevity, wellness, and mental health. Complemented by mouthwatering photography, the recipes also include lifestyle tips (including the best times to eat dinner and proper portion sizes), all gleaned from countries as far away as Japan and as near as Blue Zones project cities in Texas. Innovative, easy to follow, and delicious, these healthy living recipes make the Blue Zones lifestyle even more attainable, thereby improving your health, extending your life, and filling your kitchen with happiness.

Review

Best Seller Lists:
   • Publishers Weekly 2/10: #15
   • Indie Bestseller List 2/5: #9
   • NEIBA: 2/2 #8
   • SIBA: 2/2: #15
   • MPIBA: 2/2: #6
   • NAIBA: 2/2: #13
   • MIBA: 2/2: #4

“The photographs are gorgeous and the write ups are very interesting.” –Man of La Book
 
“It’s gorgeous and full of delicious sounding recipes.” –Read. Eat. Repeat.
 
“What an amazing book! The pictures are gorgeous!... I also enjoyed the travel stories and health information to incorporate into every day cooking and eating. So many great recipes that I can’t wait to try!” –Instagram: @books_with_bethany
 
“The Blue Zones Kitchen is an beautifully presented package and contains the kind of page-turing information that will make it hard to put this book down once you’ve started, unless it’s to try out one of the tantalizing but healthy dishes pictured on its pages.” –Run Wright
 
“I’ve already flagged almost half the book to try. The Okinawa and Ikaria sections are definitely looking like they’ll be my favorites, but honestly, there is so much deliciousness in these pages. Plus, you need a solid cookbook collection for eternal life. “ –Instagram: @jenabrownwrights
 
“Who doesn’t want to live longer, right?... This book has a ton of recipes, bright and beautiful pictures of both food and culture, and for the weirdos out there like me, the cover has an awesome book-feel.” –Instagram: @thelastbiteblog
“As with any National Geographic book, the photography and presentation are both stunning. It drives you to want to make the food as soon as you can.” –Jennifer – Tar Heel Reader
 
“It was chock full of delicious recipes, beautiful photographs, and fascinating stories about the five regions (blue zones) that are the focus of this awesome cookbook. I absolutely LOVED flipping through and reading about Sardinia and Okinawa. This was truly a gem of a book.” –A Bookish Way of Life
 
“The Blue Zones Kitchen is so much more than a cookbook! I like that the recipes have a backstory thanks to Dan Buettner’s research. I really enjoyed all aspects of the book.” –Living My Best Book Life
 
“It’s a beautiful book, full of National Geographic quality photographs, not only of the food, but of the people who cook it in their environments.” –Eliot’s Eats
 
“The Blue Zones Kitchen is actually more than a cookbook, it''s also a wellness book, a travelogue and a resource for healthy eating and longevity. Because it is published by National Geographic, you know it''s going to be full of beautiful and breathtaking photos of food as well as the blue zones it represents and some of the people living their best lives in the five blue zones.” –Kahakai Kitchen
 
“I think this is a great book to add to any cookbook collection.” –From the TBR Pile
 
“Cookbooks aren’t something that I typically read through. I love buying them and flipping through the recipes, making a dish here and there, but that’s about as much love as they usually get from me.  The Blue Zones Kitchen, though, I literally read through this entire book front to back. The idea of these Blue Zones was so fascinating to me, but the stories of the people in these areas is what I found truly captivating. I loved reading about the author’s journey through these communities, and how food plays a part in their daily lives. Dan Buettner’s detailed storytelling paired with the beautiful photographs from David McLain reminded me of times when my own grandmother was teaching me recipes that were passed down to her.” –PNW Pixie
 
“As a mid-level foodie and kitchen improvisor who tries to eat mindfully (though I’m not a vegetarian), I found this cookbook really expanded my idea of meat-free eating.” –Bibliotica
 
“About 15 years ago, National Geographic Fellow Dan Buettner identified the places around the world where people live the longest and he drew a blue line around each area. He discovered specific dietary habits that people in those Blue Zones had in common, and developed this cookbook filled with recipes inspired by those locations: Sardinia, Italy; Nicoya, Costa Rica; Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan and Loma Linda, California. Food is a great way to get to know a culture, and these stories and photos will whet your appetite. Now is an ideal time to try these recipes; if you live to be 100, you just may get to visit all five places in person.” –Forbes.com

“It sure is tempting to think that you could (healthfully) eat your way to 100.” – Better Homes & Gardens

“It''ll help you lose weight and live longer—but this is definitely not your typical fad diet.”
–Shape.com

“Simply put, Dan Buettner has written the ultimate manual for longevity.” – NY Journal of Books

“As our “Eating to 100 TODAY” series continues, special anchor Maria Shriver reports on “The Blue Zones Kitchen,” in which author Dan Buettner shares recipes from places where people live longer and healthier. He says one common denominator among long-lived people is a plant-based diet.” –MSN.com

“So, that''s what people in the Blue Zones do to make it past 100 years old. No elixirs, pills, or workout regimens here. Their "fountain of youth" is really quite simple—staying active; eating whole, plant-based carbs; and socializing with friends can really add years to your life.”
–MindBodyGreen

“Blue Zone residents, whether they''re home in Loma Linda, California; Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia, Italy; or Nicoya, Costa Rica, all eat very little meat. Instead, they subsist on a largely plant-based diet filled with beans, nuts, and cruciferous vegetables, which Buettner has written about in a new cookbook.” –Business Insider 

"His list of staples shows that eating foods linked to longevity doesn’t require a big food budget or living near a grocery market filled with all the latest-and-greatest products. The key is eating a plant-forward diet and whole grains—all foods you can find no matter where in the world you live." –Well + Good

“In his book, Buettner lays out many dos and don’ts for longevity diets and has a helpful guideline to get you on the longevity path…Other tips from Buettner’s book includes retreating from meat, cutting down on fish, reducing dairy, slashing sugar, and eating lots of beans and nuts…Luckily, Buettner has an entire book of 100 recipes to help guide us along the way.” –La Cucina Italiana

About the Author

DAN BUETTNER is the founder of Blue Zones, an organization that helps Americans live longer, healthier lives. His groundbreaking work on longevity led to his 2005 National Geographic cover story "Secrets of Living Longer" and a second, "The Search for Happiness," in 2017. Buettner has authored three national bestsellers: The Blue Zones, Thrive, and The Blue Zones Solution. He is also the author of The Blue Zones of Happiness (2017) and is a National Geographic Explorer.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
9,021 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

Betsy Teutsch
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Beautiful Cookbook that is Ridiculously User Unfriendly
Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2019
I am a big fan of the Blue Zones recipes, and general research and theory. I so wanted to like this book. However, it has two major flaws from a user standpoint. One is it features ingredients from Blue Zones that are impossible to access in my neck of the woods and does... See more
I am a big fan of the Blue Zones recipes, and general research and theory. I so wanted to like this book. However, it has two major flaws from a user standpoint. One is it features ingredients from Blue Zones that are impossible to access in my neck of the woods and does not offer substitutes. So no wild fennel growing by you? You''ll miss the chance to make about 15 of the 100 recipes.
And the book has no INDEX. How the hell can you look up a recipe? The recipes are organized by country. Suppose you have sweet potatoes on hand and are looking for a healthy way to prepare them? You are out of luck, unless you read through the titles of 100 recipes and find one that matches your criteria. Suppose you want to make a soup? Look through each of the five Blue Zones and see if they make soup there. Ridiculous to print a cookbook with no index. If you have it on Kindle, maybe, but in print - dereliction of editorial duty!
1,565 people found this helpful
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Joanna D.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Recipes with Blue Zone food ingredients for long life
Reviewed in the United States on December 3, 2019
Blue Zones: areas of the world where the residents have a long, healthy old age. Okinawa is one of them, and the recipe here for sweet potatoes is one I''m familiar with. In fact, I spent time in Japan, found I lost weight without trying (something normally difficult for me)... See more
Blue Zones: areas of the world where the residents have a long, healthy old age. Okinawa is one of them, and the recipe here for sweet potatoes is one I''m familiar with. In fact, I spent time in Japan, found I lost weight without trying (something normally difficult for me) running my legs off up and down stairs and eating nearly no sugar for the time I was there. The lack of sugar was startling in the Japanese diet, in particular.

The one hundred recipes in "Blue Zone Kitchens" are not outlandish and though there are a few unusual ingredients, they are obtainable by mail order if you live in a more remote area; for example goji berries are found in health food stores and Asian groceries but you can mail order them. These are used in a breakfast oatmeal dish and they add a lot of important anti-oxidants.

Most of the recipes, however are things you can find anywhere and are not unusual. You can find more recipes such as Pumpkin pancakes. Breakfast burritos with black beans by signing up for the Blue Zone website and newsletter.

So not only eating but lifestyle is important; having friends and family in a tight network (a friend who lived in a Thai village said it was UNTHINKABLE to be alone) and plenty of gentle but daily constant exercise and movement. And the Okinawan idea of eating 80 percent full known as "hara hachi bu".

I was amused to see Hearts of Palm ceviche (raw "fish" marinated) as I love hearts of palm but here they are only found canned. Still, they are really delicious and you can make a meal out of a salad if you cut them up and put them in. Better than artichokes. The Costa Rican recipes in particular are light and flavorful. Though I love Japanese food, I actually loved the Costa Rica chapter the best.

And the ancient foods of Sardinia; you haven''t lived until you''ve tried Fregula, their primitive, rolled pasta, a relative of cous cous. It''s really good. There is one recipe for fregula with asparagus but it''s versatile and very light. You get pasta, but you don''t feel heavy after eating it. There is also a recipe for the Sardinian flatbread, their ancient bread originally made on the floor of woodfired ovens. You can see this being made in one of the episodes of Anthony Bourdain.

Lots of delicious recipes. Will you live longer? Not sure this book alone will do it, but good recipes high in fiber and low in saturated fats and full of flavor.
517 people found this helpful
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C B
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Go from Standard American Diet to the Blue Zone. Be aware recipes contain white flour, sugar etc
Reviewed in the United States on December 3, 2019
This plant-based cookbook contains recipes from some of the healthiest regions of the world, the Blue Zones. Be aware, however, that many recipes include white flour, refined sugar, oils, or may be fried. These recipes will not fit in with Dr. Esselstyn''s heart disease... See more
This plant-based cookbook contains recipes from some of the healthiest regions of the world, the Blue Zones. Be aware, however, that many recipes include white flour, refined sugar, oils, or may be fried. These recipes will not fit in with Dr. Esselstyn''s heart disease prevention diet, Forks over Knives, The Alzheimer''s Solution, or other currently popular diet programs for specific health concerns that also take inspiration from the Blue Zones. However, the recipes are still miles ahead of the Standard American Diet which most people follow. Therefore, many of us will benefit from this approach. And the recipes should appeal to everyone, no matter what diet or lifestyle you choose.

The recipes are organized by region, not category. Beyond the actual recipes in this cookbook is a section which details the healthiest ingredients from each region featured in the book, as well as explanations why each ingredient is important. Almost all of these ingredients are easy to find at most supermarkets, or perhaps an occasional trip to an Asian market. Occasional substitutions are listed, such as using sweet potatoes instead of yuca in the Yuca Cakes recipe.

The recipes are pretty much what you might expect for regional selections. Stuffed grape leaves from Greece. Toasted fregula from Sardinia. Okinawan Sweet Bread. And smoothies and smoothie bowls from Loma Linda. Throughout the book, though, you''ll find a wide range of flavors, seasonings, and cooking techniques that bring extra flavor and variety to each meal.

I was drawn to this cookbook not only because of the proven studies showing longer, healthier, and happier lives in the Blue Zones, but also because my mother has Alzheimer''s and I worry about my own future. The Blue Zones are also regions where Alzheimer''s rates are some of the lowest in the world. Loma Linda, California, boasts the lowest rates in our country.

I''m already familiar with some of the recipes in this cookbook and look forward to trying more. Highly recommended.
393 people found this helpful
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DanaJ
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''m 30 + recipes in and It''s Love/Hate
Reviewed in the United States on December 5, 2019
UPDATE #2: After cooking 30+ recipes I have a love/hate relationship with this book. I picked recipes with accessible ingredients or substitutions I felt good about, not those with flour, sugars, potatoes, corn, etc. My husband, my two teenagers and I have loved almost... See more
UPDATE #2: After cooking 30+ recipes I have a love/hate relationship with this book. I picked recipes with accessible ingredients or substitutions I felt good about, not those with flour, sugars, potatoes, corn, etc. My husband, my two teenagers and I have loved almost everything we tried! But I keep taking away stars out of frustration! The binding is falling apart. Photos do not all accurately represent recipes. Some ingredient ratios are off. Some serving sizes are off. Some cooking temps and times are off. I still cannot find a good number of ingredients, especially produce. While some ingredients are indigenous to these lands, I do not have access to them or suggested substitutions. There is overuse of common substitutions for the US, IE: potatoes. There is also overuse of nut milks which are loaded with unhealthy ingredients in the US or are very expensive for organic or more "whole" brands.

And this whole book is vegetarian! I''ve been following Blue Zone info for years, and there has been mention of seafood and meats harvested in each zone. What happened? The author has lost credibility with me. It feels like the original Blue Zone recipes have been altered by the author to represent his current personal and political platforms. Why not "report" original recipes as they were collected and let readers alter as desired? Do I believe these are the real recipes passed thru generations? Not anymore.

However, there are some unintended positive consequences of eating Blue Zone Vegetarian. My weekly grocery bill has been significantly reduced. I am using my Instant Pot for dry beans like crazy. And now after the holidays, my family is actually MISSING eating Blue Zone foods and ready to return to exploring more recipes from this book and cooking our favorites again! It just takes an experienced cook to sort thru all of the issues within this book to make it work.

I initially was concerned with obscure ingredients and the use of what I would consider unhealthy Western foods such as AP flour, sugar, corn, potatoes, etc. And with thorough examination, I am less than enamored by the chapter from the California Blue Zone, Loma Linda. In fact, it feels completely out of place in the book. The history of this particular Blue Zone is far too short to substantiate longevity findings. And I chuckle every time I flip past the photo showing a potluck with a bottle of ranch dressing front and center!
251 people found this helpful
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Cathie-vcrkawduc
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Print is up side down from cover
Reviewed in the United States on December 3, 2019
Great book and recipes BUT so glad it was not a present for someone else. The cover of the bound book is backwards and print is up side down with the cover. NOT Good quality control. I will keep it because it is for me.
127 people found this helpful
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Castle Rock Reader
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Vegan Cookbook Even Though Earlier Blue Zones Books Didn''t Promote Veganism
Reviewed in the United States on January 2, 2020
I hate to do this--the cookbook is pretty and I enjoyed reading about the different Blue Zones--but I''m calling foul on this one. I read the original Blue Zones book some years ago and loved it; there''s a lot of great information on how people are living well in these... See more
I hate to do this--the cookbook is pretty and I enjoyed reading about the different Blue Zones--but I''m calling foul on this one. I read the original Blue Zones book some years ago and loved it; there''s a lot of great information on how people are living well in these regions of the world. There were also some good recipes. Yes, many veg recipes, but there was meat and there was fish and there was dairy. Fast forward to now. The research hasn''t changed--Buettner didn''t go back and conduct new research, he just went back and collected some recipes. All of them vegan. What HAS changed? Buettner married a pretty prolific, popular vegan chef. He''s obviously a vegan now and therefore all those people in Blue Zones seem to be now as well. I have no problem with vegan recipes and cookbooks; I just feel the author is being disingenuous with this book by making it seem as though veganism is the way these people have made it to their 100th year and literally changing his story from the previous Blue Zones book. So if you want really good looking vegan recipes with some nice stories about people living in Blue Zones, this is your book. But I''d recommend his book The Blue Zones Solution instead if you want a more accurate look at how people in the Blue Zones really eat and live.
80 people found this helpful
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Celia Page
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Eleni''s sour dough bread recipe from the book
Reviewed in the United States on December 21, 2019
This is my first ever review of a recipe from a book on Amazon. This recipe is bad! After stirring it up and doing all the prep, I googled blue zone sour dough bread recipes. Apparently most recipes call for two cups of water not just 1 as in the recipe in the book. In... See more
This is my first ever review of a recipe from a book on Amazon. This recipe is bad! After stirring it up and doing all the prep, I googled blue zone sour dough bread recipes. Apparently most recipes call for two cups of water not just 1 as in the recipe in the book. In addition the cooking temperature and time are not good because it was still raw in the middle after cooking it an additional 15 minutes. Epic fail. I wasted starter, ingredients and several hours. I think the Blue Zone author should use a recipe tester.
76 people found this helpful
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mama
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Recipes seem blah, a typical day of eating left unclear
Reviewed in the United States on December 7, 2019
The book is divided into regions. I enjoyed reading about each region and the ingredients they use. But I was not left with a clear example of a typical breakfast, lunch and dinner. I am still wondering how many slices of sourdough bread is typically eaten in a day. And... See more
The book is divided into regions. I enjoyed reading about each region and the ingredients they use. But I was not left with a clear example of a typical breakfast, lunch and dinner. I am still wondering how many slices of sourdough bread is typically eaten in a day. And the first recipe I tried, Toasted Fregula (type of pasta) with Asparagus, while easy to make, lacked any real flavor. I was left wondering, should I be eating this dish solely as my meal, or pairing with something like bread, or with some other side dish, or soup,? I think a typical full day of dishes a person might consume for each region would be helpful to help me figure this out. And I''m hoping the other recipes are more flavorful, or no wonder they don''t overeat.
71 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
US Measurements useless for UK cooks
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 23, 2020
While the recipes themselves seem good, it’s so frustrating to have opened this and discovered that all measurements are American and therefore all recipes are incredibly complicated for UK users as I have to convert everything before I can start. I wouldn’t have a problem...See more
While the recipes themselves seem good, it’s so frustrating to have opened this and discovered that all measurements are American and therefore all recipes are incredibly complicated for UK users as I have to convert everything before I can start. I wouldn’t have a problem with this if it had been made clear in the product description but it is not and I feel really quite cheated. Not the fault of the author but the publishers, who should have either printed a UK version or made it extremely clear on point of purchase what you are getting.
72 people found this helpful
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Carole Blackwell
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ingredients issue
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 12, 2020
Most of the ingredients are not available in the UK. Additionally, there is no alphabetical list of menus which makes it difficult to find what you want. Although recipes are interesting it is super hard to find what you want.
32 people found this helpful
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Book examiner
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Recipes not well researched or described.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 2, 2021
No index. American measures - a cup of this, three quarters of a cup of that. Most of the recipes and zones are well chosen (Sardinia, Okinawa) and use fresh ingredients, but including the ones from Loma Linda is just an aberration: the 4 ingredient Chocolate Mousse pie...See more
No index. American measures - a cup of this, three quarters of a cup of that. Most of the recipes and zones are well chosen (Sardinia, Okinawa) and use fresh ingredients, but including the ones from Loma Linda is just an aberration: the 4 ingredient Chocolate Mousse pie where one of the 4 ingredients is a ready-made Graham cracker pie crust tells you all you need to know about this section (and the state of American cuisine, if that’s their standard of healthy). The Dashi recipe is just wrong. Tells you to soak the dashi overnight and then throw away the water and then heat the kombu in fresh water. Well that’s how to throw away all your flavour and nutrients, isn’t it. Better to use one of the many kombu dashi recipes on the internet. The photographs are great but overall this book is a big disappointment.
8 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Easy and inspirational.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 17, 2021
I’m so glad I ignored the reviews about odd ingredients or measurements. This is a fab book with inspirational yet often simple recipes. Easy enough to convert the recipes from US measurements and add pencil notes or just invest in some US cup measures. There are a few more...See more
I’m so glad I ignored the reviews about odd ingredients or measurements. This is a fab book with inspirational yet often simple recipes. Easy enough to convert the recipes from US measurements and add pencil notes or just invest in some US cup measures. There are a few more exotic recipes/ingredients but I find that really fascinating and there are substitutes suggested. You can also find lots of these things online if you really want to make it authentically. Personally I never expected to be able to make authentic Okinawian dishes out of ingredients from my local Asda. It’s a really interesting bit of culinary anthropology and a great dietary inspiration. The Falafel recipe is yummy.
5 people found this helpful
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Mrs A Fairbank
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A freezer full of soup
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 2, 2020
I bought this book to follow on from the Blue Zones book by the same authors. I have already made the soups ''cream of broccoli'' and ''cream of mushroom''. Great simple recipes to start. Try to use fresh herbs for the best results. I will work my way up to the Okinawa dishes...See more
I bought this book to follow on from the Blue Zones book by the same authors. I have already made the soups ''cream of broccoli'' and ''cream of mushroom''. Great simple recipes to start. Try to use fresh herbs for the best results. I will work my way up to the Okinawa dishes as those ingredients are a bit more pricey and harder to find locally. I may need a bigger freezer!
6 people found this helpful
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Blue Zones Kitchen

Secrets to a longer, better life

If you want to live to a healthy 100, eat like healthy people who’ve lived to 100. Working with renowned doctors and experts Gianni Pes and Michel Poulain, we identified the places around the world where people live the longest, drawing a line around each area in blue ink. Together, we created the concept of Blues Zones: the set of characteristics that have produced the world’s longest lived people. Their secrets can help you live a longer, better life.

100 Recipes to Live to 100

Building on decades of research, longevity expert Dan Buettner has gathered 100 recipes inspired by the Blue Zones, home to the healthiest and happiest communities in the world. Each dish uses ingredients and cooking methods proven to increase longevity, wellness, and mental health.These healthy living recipes make the Blue Zones lifestyle even more attainable, thereby improving your health, extending your life, and filling your kitchen with happiness.

  • Chapter One: Sardinia
  • Chapter Two: Okinawa
  • Chapter Three: Nicoya
  • Chapter Four: Ikaria
  • Chapter Five: Loma Linda

Sweet Potato Bites

TOTAL COOK TIME: 10 MINUTES | MAKES 3 SERVINGS

1. Boil or steam the potatoes until tender, then mash potatoes with sugar.

2. Once cool enough to handle, roll potatoes into walnut-size balls.

3. On a clean surface, spread a layer of ground nuts of your choice or sesame seeds. Gently roll the potato balls in the nuts to coat.

4. Powder with cinnamon to serve.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound (about 3) white, orange, or purple sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into cubes
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1⁄3 cup ground peanuts, macadamia nuts, or sesame seeds
  • Dash of cinnamon

Cream of Pumpkin Soup

TOTAL COOK TIME: 30 MINUTES | MAKES 2 SERVINGS

1. Place a steamer tray into a pot with about 2 inches of water. Bring water to a boil and steam squash until soft, about 15 minutes.

2. In a soup pot, stir-fry leeks in vegetable oil until soft but not browned, about 3-4 minutes

3. Add soy milk, steamed squash, and spices and simmer for 15 minutes.

4. Blend all together with an immersion blender or in a food processor (in batches, if necessary) until smooth. Add salt to taste.

Ingredients:

  • ½ pound acorn or butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into large chunks
  • ¼ cup chopped leeks (or onion)
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1¾ cups unsweetened soy milk
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seed
  • 1 teaspoon dried turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon salt, plus more if needed

Product information

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

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The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale

The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to 2021 Live to outlet sale 100 outlet sale